Courage on depression a service to others

Courage on depression a service to others

By PAT WATSON

Courage. That’s what politician Celina Caesar-Chavannes had by going public about experiencing periods of depression – the kind of depression that would have her going to hospital to seek relief.

Across this planet an estimated 121 million people live with some form of depression, but fewer than one in four get adequate treatment.

According to the World Health Organization, depression is the fourth leading cause of disability. By 2020, it could become the second leading cause of disability.

Women are almost twice as likely to experience depression as men. However, at least one U.S. study found that depression is higher among older immigrant males from the Caribbean, relative to the general population.

Depression also affects people in high-income countries more than in lower-income countries.

Most people will experience deep sadness during particular life events which may extend into depression. Loss of a loved one, extended periods of unemployment and divorce are among the life events that can result in what can be called situational depression.

Read the rest of this column at

http://sharenews.com/courage-on-depression-a-service-to-others/

Pat Watson is the author of the e-book, In Through a Coloured Lens. Twitter @patprose.

Poisonous M&Ms: The Irrational Monstrosity of Bigotry

Debunking Denialism

Poisonous M&Ms?

Myths and legends about monsters have excited the human imagination for hundreds of years. Although vampires, werewolves and ghosts do not exist in reality, there are irrational belief constructs that are equally monstrous. Not just in content, but also in consequence. These are often based on exploiting common human tendencies with an additional layer of motivated reasoning reinforced by pseudoscience. This article will examine one such monster known as the the “poisonous M&Ms analogy”. It is often deployed as a way to prop up indefensible stereotypes by taking advantage of human ignorance about base rates, risk assessment and criminology. In the end, it tries to divert attention from the inherent bigotry in making flawed generalizations.

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Waking up for the post racial

whiteMy social circle is multi-ethnic and therefore includes some individuals who would identify as White. They are all, as the saying goes, ‘nice people’. We hang out. We socialize. We talk and text by phone with each other. Yet, every single person in my social circle who is White holds some aspect of the White-way-is-the-right-way (W-w-i-t-r way) mindset that rests on implicit preeminence of White culture and history and conversely imbedded anti-Black perceptions.

How can that be?

The scale and depth of race affectation that constitutes the foundation of modern Western culture means there would hardly be any person who has not been influenced by and inculcated with the W-w-i-t-r way. It pervades our way of life from the standard measurements for off-the-rack clothing to the demographics of prison populations to the quality of healthcare, and education curriculum content. Systemic, as the social scientists like to say.

More intimately, there are configurations of one-to-one racism:

  • There are the overts. Wrong and strong, the overts make other White persons uncomfortable as well.
  • There are the coverts – the subtle ones. The ones who, after an encounter with them, leave you asking yourself, ‘Did what I think just happened actually happen?’
  • Finally, there are the unaware, of which there are basic categories.
  • — Those who never have to give the matter a single thought; perhaps that comes with living in a part of the Western world where one never encounters diverse social groups.
  • — The other group is where I locate my friends. These are people who would earnestly declare themselves anti-racist, march alongside in a protest, agree that policing has to change. Yet, because of the scale and subtle layers of the W-w-i-t-r way, they cannot escape being inadvertent functionaries. Again, multilayered and complex.

So, how do we awaken friends who are asleep to racism by circumstance – having been born into a social-psychological ecosystem that leans away from universal human equity in form and function.

Imagine an everyday situation: You are out in public and the tag of your shirt is sticking out. You can’t see it, but the person next to you can. They say, “Hey buddy, your shirt tag is sticking out.’ You don’t say, ‘No, I don’t even have a shirt tag, get away from me you shirt tag pedant.’

You reach around to the back of the shirt feel the tag and adjust it. Perhaps thank the person for their considerateness. Maybe the next time you wear the shirt, you would check for the tag first. Or, for better freedom of movement, remove it entirely.

As we are indoctrinated with the W-w-i-t-r way and can’t see it (yet engage in actions or words of which observant witnesses are aware), we may reflexively deny any such behavior.

It can be personally alarming and embarrassing to hear, ‘Hey, buddy that thing you just said or that thing you just did is racist.’ Being called to account for actions we are inured to can suddenly feel like a shaming experience.

But, as with the unseen shirt tag scenario, try using, ‘Oh, I didn’t even realize that, I couldn’t see it. Thanks for letting me know. I’ll look into it.’

With any luck, you will then have a keyhole into other previously unaware behavior. Or, ask a ‘Black friend’. If they are as the saying goes ‘woke’, they could provide some insight.

The result is that we will have grown in awareness somewhat, and more comfortably wear the mantle of a person who wants to be in a world where we greet one another more equitably and with healthy human regard.

Pat Watson is the author of the e-book, In Through A Coloured Lens available through Amazon. Twitter @patprose.

 

An African fable on how humans learned to walk could be the most translated short story ever — Quartz

A fable on how humans learnt to walk upright is the most translated short story in African history, according to the group that published it. The piece was written by award-winning veteran Kenyan author, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, and published by the Pan-African collective Jalada Africa. Titled “The Upright Revolution: Or Why Humans Walk Upright,” it…

via An African fable on how humans learned to walk could be the most translated short story ever — Quartz

Anti-Black Racism 101: Stop Canadiansplaining

Chelby Marie Daigle

cb48_12 My first Black Ken Doll

-splaining: a combining form extracted from mansplain, and meaning “to explain or comment on something in a condescending, overconfident, and often inaccurate or oversimplified manner, from the perspective of the group one identifies with

So what is “Canadiansplaining”? It is a word I just made up to describe some recent experiences I’ve had. It’s like Whitesplaining but I have experienced it from both White and racialized Canadians who are not Black or Indigenous.

Since the rise in media attention given to Black Canadians organizing around Black Lives Matter I have had to listen to a lot of “Canadiansplaining” when I have spoken up about my own experiences of anti-Black racism in the presence of some White folks and racialized folks who are not Black or Indigenous.

This usually entails them making me aware of how even though Black folks in Canada are subjected to…

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