Five years of research catalogues 4,000 blacks lynched in the American South — some as recently as 1950

National Post

Brandon Thibodeaux / The New York Times Brandon Thibodeaux / The New York Times

DALLAS — A block from the tourist-swarmed former Texas School Book Depository sits the old county courthouse, now a museum. In 1910, a group of men rushed into the courthouse, threw a rope around the neck of a black man accused of sexually assaulting a 3-year-old white girl, and threw the other end of the rope out a window.

A mob outside yanked the man, Allen Brooks, to the ground and strung him up at a ceremonial arch a few blocks down Main Street.

South of the city, past the Trinity River bottoms, a black man named W.R. Taylor was hanged by a mob in 1889. Farther south still is the community of Streetman, where 25-year-old George Gay was hung from a tree and shot hundreds of times in 1922.

And just beyond that is Kirkin, where three black men, two of them…

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