The dilemma of the Cosby sex allegations

             Cosby

The dilemma of the Cosby sex allegations

By PAT WATSON

With all his accomplishments and accolades, his doctor of philosophy degree in education, his millions of dollars, who would want to be Bill Cosby today?

The rumour that has dogged the man who became known as ‘America’s Dad’, that he is alleged to be a sexual predator and rapist is tying a lot of Black people in knots precisely because he has had such a long career as a well-meaning father figure in the public eye.

There was Cosby interacting with endearing and clever little children in his “Kids Say the Darndest Things” television series, and then that top-rated “Cosby Show” through which a good portion of America’s Black middle class finally felt some kind of cathartic vindication. Before that, he was moving the colour line back in the 1960s co-starring in “I Spy”. So many of us grew up to the sounds of “Fat Albert” while watching Saturday morning cartoons.

There is that Bill Cosby.

But today, we are hearing that there is another Bill Cosby.

– See more at: http://sharenews.com/the-dilemma-of-the-cosby-sex-allegations/#sthash.ffFKup0d.dpuf

Pat Watson is the author of the e-book, In Through A Coloured Lens, available through Amazon. Twitter@patprose.

Ethnic vilification: fear, hate and political gamesmanship

Ethnic vilification: fear, hate and political gamesmanship

By PAT WATSON

Stephen Harper, pragmatic arch-conservative and the current prime minister of Canada, has put a considerable amount of resources, meaning tax dollars and legal maneuverings, into denying legal rights to Canadian-born Omar Khadr.

Khadr, now 28, has just been released from a Canadian prison, after serving time for his involvement at the age of 15 in a gun battle between U.S. soldiers and al-Qaeda fighters in Afghanistan. During the battle, Khadr, who was taken to Afghanistan by his father, is said to have lobbed a hand grenade that killed an American soldier.

The Khadr family had a history of close ties to the 9-11 boogieman, Osama bin Laden, and history will show that, at 15, Omar Khadr was the youngest person held in the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba among purported Islamist terrorists and various others thought to have been involved with al-Qaeda.

More recently, after Khadr’s imprisonment and legal battles arose in the public mind, the threat of the Islamic State (IS) movement has also emerged. Before long, Canadian soldiers who had been returning home from their mission in Afghanistan were then assigned to respond to the IS threat.

A striking feature in all of this to many observers regarding the Omar Khadr case is

– See more at: http://sharenews.com/ethnic-vilification-fear-hate-and-political-gamesmanship/#sthash.7uTlsC8q.dpuf

Black Like Me, 50 Years Later

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/black-like-me-50-years-later-74543463/?all

Black Like Me, 50 Years Later

John Howard Griffin gave readers an unflinching view of the Jim Crow South. How has his book held up?

John Howard Griffin
John Howard Griffin, left in New Orleans in 1959, asked what “adjustments” a white man would have to make if he were black. (Don Rutledge)
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