Some suggestions for St. Nick’s naughty and nice lists

 

NautyNice

By PAT WATSON

We do love receiving gifts at Christmastime, don’t we? The big feature at Christmas for almost everyone is the exchange of beautifully wrapped packages as expressions of our consideration for one another. But, there is another tradition that is frequently overlooked, yet should not be since it functions is as a motivator to ensure good and decent behavior throughout the rest of the year.

That’s right, not everyone is deserving of a reward at the end of the year. Saint Nicholas had quite the job until more recently deciding who should and should get the proverbial lump of coal. It used to be that he would spend the better part of the year compiling two lists: one for those who managed to maintain good habits and social responsibility – the nice list; the other with the names of those who did the opposite – the naughty list.

It is indeed a big task. So, to help old Saint Nick along, here are a few suggestions for the nice and the naughty lists.

On the nice list is African American Tarana Burke. Actually, Burke’s name would have to have been on this list going back a decade to when she first started the movement to support Black women and girls who faced sexual abuse, the #MeToo movement. It has brought the discussion of gendered abuse to the front and given rise to millions of conversations and hopefully real soul searching among men in particular who participate in this form of violence or among those who have witnessed it without stopping it.

Also on the nice list is Toronto journalist and activist Desmond Cole. Cole just received the 2017 PEN Canada award that recognizes “work that advances freedom of expression”. Cole remains a strong voice against social injustice especially as it affects the Black population. Lately he has been considering whether he will run for mayor of Toronto in next year’s election.

Federal Liberal Member of Parliament for Whitby, Celina Caesar-Chavannes is on the nice list for taking a stand on raising awareness of racism on Parliament Hill, as well as mental health. Earlier in the year, Caesar-Chavannes spoke publicly about her experience with depression, which would have to have been a strengthening moment for other Black women or anyone having a similar challenge. Speaking publicly on this matter is no easy task because of the stigma that often threatens to silence those who live with mental illness.

Caesar-Chavannes also wrote a Facebook post about the racism she has been confronted with in Ottawa despite being an elected politician. These small everyday acts of discrimination, micro-aggressions will not defeat her she says. In her Facebook post she wrote, “Glass ceilings do not get broken by sitting on the sidelines and watching. They break when you stand up.”

The Toronto Transit Commission receives a qualified place on the nice list because the new Line 1 subway extension has finally opened. Students who attend York University will now have an easier time of getting to classes.

Mayor John Tory’s name has found its way onto the naughty list because hizzoner refused to take the advice of advocates for homeless people on how to respond to the need for more shelter spaces. Tory’s idea of how best to respond to the need for more shelter spaces is to add more mats on the floors of already crowded locations. Shame.

Torstar and Postmedia are on the naughty list for making a trade deal that was immediately followed by shutting down some 40 community newspapers.

Toronto Police Service is on the naughty list for still carding Black people and people of colour while trying to make it appear that this dreadful initiative is no long in play.

Also on the naughty list, real estate dealer turned politician, Donald Trump for more reasons than there is space here to list.

A note of thanks and appreciation…Merry Christmas to Share readers everywhere. Thank you all for making the time to read the musings in this space. Here’s hoping that your Christmas sorrel drink has just the perfect amount of Jamaican ginger.

Pat Watson is the author of the e-book, In Through A Coloured Lens. Twitter @patprose.

Advertisements

Allow backyard chickens in Toronto

 

By PAT WATSON

My grandmother in Jamaica had a chicken coop in the backyard. Decades on, I still remember the rich taste of the eggs that came from those chickens. In fact, my grandmother’s place in Kingston had a rich, growing food supply. Food bearing trees included breadfruit, avocado, grapefruit, limes, ackee, and mangoes. Space will not permit the whole range. There were all kinds of beans and edible plants and roots as well.

Immigrants to Toronto brought with them some of the same edible gardening culture as practiced in the old country. Summer into fall is the best time for sharing, neighbour-to-neighbour, the abundance that grows quickly. There is just such pleasure in the rich flavour and higher nutritional value of homegrown cucumbers, carrots, lettuce, tomatoes and potatoes for instance.

I mention this because there is a debate going on in Toronto about allowing raising of chickens in backyards.

Many activities that would be healthy and community building are forbidden in this city where hyper-caution is a reflexive response to so much that is just commonsense. Therefore, in typical Toronto Council fashion, a pilot project will be launched. How much do you suppose the environmental assessment study will cost?

There is hardly the need to run a pilot project for a home-based activity that is millennia old. But, if councillors want to create a few positions for backyard health inspectors, then okay.

But, recall the pilot project that was run a few years ago on ‘ethnic’ food carts, which was micro-managed into failure. If City Council starts insisting that coops and other related equipment be bought only from council mandated suppliers, then flags should start going up.

If this goes forward though, anticipate that the city will likely require permits that will cost a fee.

Aside from political meddling, one concern about raising chickens in backyards in Toronto has to do with land ownership. The scramble to purchase residential real estate and the forbidding price tags attached to houses with land space would mean the possibility for eating fresh, free-range eggs then becomes a class issue.

Imagine that a longtime cultural practice among peasant people could move up the social status ladder and sit next to other markers like owning a Labrador retriever or being able to afford a third or fourth child.

Already, the talk on Council regarding the pilot project is selection of wards where homes have enough backyard space. Ward 5 Etobicoke-Lakeshore would be included since Justin Di Ciano, councilor for that ward, brought forward the motion for the pilot project.

The vote on this pilot project would have taken place by now, but was delayed when the last council meeting before the summer break ended early upon news of the death of Councillor Pam McConnell. Now, the vote won’t take place until this fall, with the pilot project not coming until next spring.

In the meantime, backyard chicken lawbreakers would be well to organize to ensure they have strong advocacy to support backyard freedom.

Let City Hall know all about the benefits of raising chickens and how much they fit into the home gardening ecology. They control bugs in the garden and chicken waste is very good fertilizer enriching the soil for food plants in the home garden. Furthermore, hens are not noisy. And, the closer we are to nature the more respectful we are of it.

With the growing threat of global warming, which is a consequence of human disconnection from our natural environment, that respect is urgently needed.

Living Illusions, craving truth

Living Illusions, Craving Truth

Earthscape

BY PAT-ANGELLA

We are, most of us anyway, under an illusion that our life is our own. Yet, what evidence is there is to support this presumtion? We are informed — and ignorance contributes to this — to take ownership of an intangible something which we could not in any way possess. We do not possess life. Rather we are possessed by life. We say life, or vie, or vida… . Whatever the language, there is a sound we make that represents this thing we call life. My life. Your life. There really is no such thing.

Here is the evidence: Who among us writes the story of how his or her life will be such that the life specifically follows that script? Who is it that writes his own path, step for step; the roadmap of a life laid out exactly and then followed exactly?

If you exist, show yourself. Tell the rest of us what we have been missing.

It takes a lifetime to know a scintilla of what is real and true. And, every time we encounter some part of what is real and true, it changes everything that we know that came before it. Isn’t that so?

Now, some of us in this Earth paradigm have no care or concern with such matters. Why bother with these awarenesses if it makes no difference? For whatever reason, we are here. However we got here, we are nevertheless here. So, why not get on with the busyness of the experience as it is laid out here on Earth?

That makes sense, doesn’t it? Sure, it is a fair approach.

But, some of us want nothing better than to peek behind the curtain. We are driven to ask those age old questions regarding our very existence: Who am I really? Why am I here?

Do you ever think that perhaps our so-called real life is some cosmic rollout not unlike The Sims game, which engages players in a simulacrum of life? Oxford University philosophy professor Nick Bostrom makes the argument for this.

If we were to truly know the answer, we would have to be the game player and not the players in the game.

Globe1

Why wars? Why killings for sport? Why hatred of others? Why insert all that chaos with awareness of Love? What reality is this that lays before us in dichotomies and paradoxes?

Yet, we know only a little. Another piece of the truth is just around the corner. But, we may only have a taste of it, for it is elusive. Nevertheless, in among the Mystery — and many mysteries — of Life is the desire to look behind the curtain.